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The need

Literacy impacts not only on an individual’s economic situation, but also on their health, confidence and happiness. (Dugdale & Clark, 2008)[1]

"1 in 5 children in the UK leave primary school unable to read well enough to do well at secondary school – a figure that rises to 1 in 3 among the most disadvantaged children.” (DfE, 2015)[2]

Research shows that engaging children in reading for enjoyment is one of the most effective ways of helping them to reach their potential:

Enjoyment of reading has a greater impact on a child’s educational achievement than their parents’ socio-economic status.” (OECD, 2002)[3]

Our research shows: “Children and young people who enjoy reading very much are three times as likely to read above the level expected for their age compared with young people who do not enjoy reading at all.” (NLT, 2015)[4]

We also know that reading for enjoyment has a positive impact on wider educational attainment:

“Children who read for pleasure made more progress in maths, vocabulary and spelling between the ages of 10 and 16 than those who rarely read.” (Institute of Education, 2013)”[5]

Young people who read regularly as teenagers are significantly more likely to attain a professional or managerial position in their 30s than those who do not read:

“Reading for pleasure [is] the only [leisure activity] to be positively linked to both educational attainment and future jobs.” (Cls.ioe.ac.uk, 2016)[6]

 


[1] Dugdale, G. and Clark C. (2008). Literacy changes lives: An advocacy resource. London: National Literacy Trust.

[2] Gov.uk. (2016). Nicky Morgan and David Walliams launch child literacy campaign - Press releases - GOV.UK. [online] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/nicky-morgan-and-david-walliams-launch-child-literacy-campaign [Accessed 10 Nov. 2016].

[3] Kirsch, I., de Jong, J., Lafontaine, D., McQueen, J., Mendolevits, J. and Monseur, C. (2002). Reading for Change Performance and Engagement Across Countries Results from PISA 2000. OECD ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT.

[4] Clark, C. (2016). Children’s and Young People’s Reading in 2015. Findings from the National Literacy Trust’s annual survey 2015. London: National Literacy Trust.

[5] Sullivan, A. and Brown, M. (2013). Social inequalities in cognitive scores at age 16: The role of reading. CLS Working Paper (10). Institute of Education, University of London.

[6] Cls.ioe.ac.uk. (2016). Cohort research suggests teenagers who read are more likely to get good jobs - Centre for Longitudinal Studies. [online] Available at: http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/news.aspx?itemid=933&itemTitle=Cohort+research +suggests+teenagers+who+read+are+more+likely+to+get+good+jobs&sitesectionid=27&sitesectiontitle=News [Accessed 10 Nov. 2016].

Literacy changes lives

Literacy impacts not only on an individual’s economic situation, but also on their health, confidence and happiness.

Read report
Children’s and Young People’s Reading

Findings from the National Literacy Trust’s annual survey 2015.

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The National Literacy Trust is a registered charity no. 1116260 and a company limited by guarantee no. 5836486 registered in England and Wales and a registered charity in Scotland no. SC042944.
Registered address: 68 South Lambeth Road, London SW8 1RL.